John Danaher Reveals the Single Worst Performing Submission That We All Know

If you ask 10 top athletes about the best coach in the world, 8 out of 10 will say it’s John Danaher. The way he explains techniques and his Jiu-Jitsu philosophy is just great. This time he shares his opinion on “single worst performing” submission that we all learned in the first month of training.

Check John Danaher DVD and Digital Instructionals now ON SALE

Here is what Danaher exactly wrote on his Instagram profile:

“The great underperformer among the submission holds of jiu-jitsu: There are around fifteen to twenty families of submission holds, each with many many variations in technique and entry. These core submission holds are seen all the time in competition. Armbars, triangles rear naked strangles etc. are constantly seen successfully applied in all levels of competition.

“There is, however, one well known and foundational submission hold that has a truly miserable success rate. In fact, in twenty-five years I cannot think of even a single example of it working successfully in black belt competition at the world championship level gi or no go. This must make it the single worst performing submission hold among the various foundational submissions in our sport. Most of the other submissions perform brilliantly, but the success rate of this one is utterly feeble – can you guess what it is? It is the Americana lock (ude garami). The only example of it being used successfully that I can recall is by Jon Jones on a badly battered and exhausted Vitor Belfort in an MMA fight. This is very unusual – most core moves of the sport have excellent success rates.”

“The American lock is unquestionably a core lock of the sport. Often it is the first lock we learn and a staple of beginner classes everywhere, yet it scores so few victories that I would understand if an instructor simply stopped teaching it above white belt level. Interestingly the American lock is actually very strong and potentially devastating once it is applied. The failure is not MECHANICAL, an American lock will break an arm just as surely as a kimura or juji gatame or any other (in fact I would argue that the breaking potential of a well applied American lock is superior to most other joint locks) So why the failure to be successfully applied in competition? If it’s not mechanical, the failure must reside in SETUPS/ENTRY and in the ability to COPE WITH RESISTANCE/COUNTERS. Do you think this great failure of the submission family can be rehabilitated? Can we improve our setups to make this lock work in competition? Or is it destined to be forever the underperformer of jiu-jitsu? Let me know your thoughts!”

Do you agree with Danaher on this one? Is Americana really that useless? Did you have any success with it? Tell us in the comments!

View this post on Instagram

The great under performer among the submission holds of jiu jitsu: There are around fifteen to twenty families of submission holds, each with many many variations in technique and entry. These core submission holds are seen all the time in competition. Arm bars, triangles rear naked strangles etc. are constantly seen successfully applied in all levels of competition. There is however, one well known and foundational submission hold that has a truly miserable success rate. In fact, in twenty five years I cannot think of even a single example of it working successfully in black belt competition at the world championship level gi or no gi. This must make it the single worst performing submission hold among the various foundational submissions in our sport. Most of the other submissions perform brilliantly, but the success rate of this one is utterly feeble – can you guess what it is? It is the Americana lock (ude garami). The only example of it being used successfully that I can recall is by Jon Jones on a badly battered and exhausted Vitor Belfort in an MMA fight. This is very unusual – most core moves of the sport have excellent success rates. The American lock is unquestionably a core lock of the sport. Often it is the first lock we learn and a staple of beginner classes everywhere, yet it scores so few victories that I would understand if an instructor simply stopped teaching it above white belt level. Interestingly the American lock is actually very strong and potentially devastating once it is applied. The failure is not MECHANICAL, an American lock will break an arm just as surely as a kimura or juji gatame or any other (in fact I would argue that the breaking potential of a well applied American lock is superior to most other joint locks) So why the failure to be successfully applied in competition? If it’s not mechanical, the failure must reside in SET UPS/ENTRY and in ability to COPE WITH RESISTANCE/COUNTERS. Do you think this great failure of the submission family can be rehabilitated? Can we improve our set ups to make this lock work in competition? Or is it destined to be forever the under performer of jiu jitsu? Let me know your thoughts!

A post shared by John Danaher (@danaherjohn) on